March 24

Summerfield v. Staples Canada Inc.: Mitigation – Meeting the Requirements, Toronto Employment Lawyer

Call us for a FREE 30 minute phone consultation at 416-907-9249 or submit a callback request   Mitigation in the employment law context is the term used regarding the terminated employee’s attempts at finding comparable, new employment post-termination.  Mitigation is a vital part of any wrongful termination matter, as your overall notice period or package.

February 17

Styles v. Alberta Investment Management: “Active Employment” and Bonuses, Toronto Employment Lawyer

Call us for a FREE 30 minute phone consultation at 416-907-9249 or submit a callback request Alberta’s highest court recently considered, in Styles v Alberta Investment Management Corporation, 2017 ABCA 1 (CanLII), whether being “actively employed” ousts an employee’s eligibility to receive  bonuses under a Long Term Incentive Plan.  As readers of our blog will.

February 10

Common Contractual Terms and General Tips, Toronto Employment Lawyer

Call us for a FREE 30 minute phone consultation at 416-907-9249 or submit a callback request A well-drafted written contract has several significant benefits: it reduces the risk of misunderstandings, it addresses contentious issues early, and decreases uncertainties.  An employment contract may include any terms that are not prohibited by law. The following are some.

February 7

Working Notice – The Ins and Outs, Toronto Employment Lawyer

Call us for a FREE 30 minute phone consultation at 416-907-9249 or submit a callback request   When an employer is terminating an employee without cause, they have three options with respect to the notice they are providing: 1.      Pay out the employee the value of the notice period but no longer require them to.

January 25

Bishop v. Rexel: Termination vs. Resignation, Toronto Employment Lawyer

Call us for a FREE 30 minute phone consultation at 416-907-9249 or submit a callback request Resignation v. Termination: Toronto Employment Lawyer A voluntary resignation by an employee, or a dismissal by an employer? Resignations In most cases, an employee who gives their employer a notice of resignation is not legally entitled to wrongful dismissal.

January 17

Sinnathamby v. The Chesterfield: Duty to mitigate, Toronto Employment Lawyer

Call us for a FREE 30 minute phone consultation at 416-907-9249 or submit a callback request The Consequences of Failing to Mitigate: Toronto Employment Lawyer The importance of applying for jobs when suing your employer Duty to Mitigate Following a wrongful dismissal, an employee has an obligation to mitigate their losses, that is to lessen.

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